Making a Content Web Site

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Opening Statement Text Image Tables Hyperlinks Navigation Artistic Concerns Content Conclusion
Information Images Code Help Compliance Copyright Trial versions of Software

Here are some links to sites that can help you with the Content on a web site or in arranging the Content on the web site:

Information:

Since my audience of this is inclined to be in Virginia, your first place to visit for information should be VIVA, which you have access to as a student, faculty member, or staff member of an institution of higher learning. VIVA is a collection of indexes and databases that cover nearly every subject. It is paid for by your state taxes. Tapping into this resource gives you the latest news, periodicals, and information (including today's headlines) and allows you to email, print, or otherwise download full text and graphics if need be for those articles. You can also ILL (Interlibrary Loan) through this feature if your institution supports that option. For research papers and for data to place on subject-based websites, this resource is the ultimate collection of referred journals, newspaper full text-articles, archival materials, and even reference works.

Images:

Beyond images specific to your content itself, you may need background images, iconic images, or other graphics to enhance your web site. For a huge collection of free images for educational use, see Microsoft's Office Clip Art and Media Home Page (basically the Digital Library for Microsoft). Even if you may not be a Microsfot fan, this collection has free graphics, clip art, animated gifs, and even photographs to use for educational web sites. Also, you can create free buttons on this web site called Button Generator. This is most helpful with Navigation icons and such, especially if you need them quick and uniform. If you decide to use Goggle's Image search, please be aware that many of those images are most likely copyrighted and you should ask permission. Most authors, if you email them politely, give permission to use those graphics for a subject-based website or a educational web site.For original graphics, you can always create your own using such programs as Adobe Photoshop or Macromedia Fireworks, but remember: you are building a subject-based web site (or your students are). If you start to design graphics, you may be taking time away from the content itself if you have to get another program to help you. It becomes a balance. Searching for the graphics is much easier and faster.

Code Help:

Help with HTML codes, the hexadecimal codes and having a color wheel can become vital to your mission. Searching in Google for these sites can be just as efficient as using these I've listed here:

Compliance:

To check your code for acceptance and compliance with all the differenc browser and code support out there,

Copyright Information

 

Trial Versions:

And lastly, for trial versions of software, try these web sites:

Also, there are many freeware and shareware web editing programs. Try www.downloads.com to find many of these other programs.

 

Practice? Content is depended on what subject you are trying to convey. Enjoy the variety without practice.

Next, Conclusion.

Opening Statement Text Image Tables Hyperlinks Navigation Artistic Concerns Content Conclusion

Making a Content Web Site

Site Map

Content
How do you do it?

Click to Content - Why is it important